Showing posts tagged Germany

Wooden shields preserved in Thorsberg moor, Germany, ca. 3rd century A.D. Photo by Bullenwächter, via @irarchaeology on Twitter

Late Mesolithic collection of skulls arranged in a kind of nest, presumed to be a trophy collection, from Ofnet Cave in Bavaria. The skulls represent decapitations of men, women, and children including infants, some of them killed just prior by blunt force to the back of the skull.  Photo credit

Late Mesolithic collection of skulls arranged in a kind of nest, presumed to be a trophy collection, from Ofnet Cave in Bavaria. The skulls represent decapitations of men, women, and children including infants, some of them killed just prior by blunt force to the back of the skull.  Photo credit

blue-eyed-devil-88:

A member of the Haiminger Krampusgruppe dressed as Krampus hits a fire to release sparks on the town square during their annual Krampusnacht in Tyrol, on December 1, 2013.

(Reblogged from hierarchical-aestheticism)

effervescentaardvark:

Chainmail - signed with yellow alloy ‘maker’s link’, and decorated with yellow-alloy edges, denoting the high quality of the chainmail. (German, late 14th or early 15th century, weight 8.84kg)

source: “Masterpieces of European Arms and Armour in the Wallace Collection” by Tobias Capwell. ISBN: 9780900785863

(Reblogged from vandrare)
(Reblogged from travelwriticus)
archaeoblogs:

Whence the Earliest Berliners? (Part 1)Source: http://bit.ly/1dXdCAn This week, I’m hanging out in Chapel Hill at the Isotope Geochemistry Lab on UNC’s campus.  I’m here to process human dental enamel from Medieval Germans for strontium, to test the hypothesis that the earliest residents of modern Berlin migrated east from Cologne. A bit of background for this project: In the early 13th century AD, two towns were built on opposite sides of the Spree River.  Called Berlin (or, sometimes, Altberlin) and Cölln, they eventually became one city in the 18th century (modern Berlin).  Although there are early historical records mentioning each 13th century………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

archaeoblogs:

Whence the Earliest Berliners? (Part 1)
Source: http://bit.ly/1dXdCAn

This week, I’m hanging out in Chapel Hill at the Isotope Geochemistry Lab on UNC’s campus.  I’m here to process human dental enamel from Medieval Germans for strontium, to test the hypothesis that the earliest residents of modern Berlin migrated east from Cologne. A bit of background for this project: In the early 13th century AD, two towns were built on opposite sides of the Spree River.  Called Berlin (or, sometimes, Altberlin) and Cölln, they eventually became one city in the 18th century (modern Berlin).  Although there are early historical records mentioning each 13th century………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

(Reblogged from archaeoblogs)

stellairon:

The Berlin Gold Hat or Berlin Golden Hat (German: Berliner Goldhut) is a Late Bronze Age artefact made of thin gold leaf. It served as the external covering on a long conical brimmed headdress, probably of an organic material.

The Berlin Gold Hat is the best preserved specimen among the four known conical Golden hats known from Bronze Age Central Europe so far. Of the three others, two were found in southern Germany, and one in the west of France. All were found in the 19th and 20th centuries.

It is generally assumed that the hats served as the insignia of deities or priests in the context of a sun cult that appears to have been widespread in Central Europe at the time. [1].

The hats are also suggested to have served astronomical/calendrical functions (see below).

The Berlin Gold Hat was acquired in 1996 by the Berlin Museum für Vor- und Frühgeschichte as a single find without provenance. A comparative study of the ornaments and techniques in conjunction with dateable finds suggests that it was made in the Late Bronze Age, circa 1,000 to 800 BC.

(Reblogged from stellairon)
The matron was rapt away, with streaming hair, bound fast
Without even a sad farewell to the household gods.
Nor could the captive press a kiss on the threshhold
Nor cast one backward glance toward what was lost.
A wife’s naked feet trod in her husband’s blood
And the tender sister stepped over the fallen brother.
The boy torn from his mother’s embrace, his funeral plaint
Hung on her lips, with all her tears unshed.
So to lose the life of a child is not the heaviest lot,
Gasping, the mother lost even her pious tears.
I, the barbarian woman, seek not to count these tears,
Nor to keep afloat in the melancholy lake of all those drops.
Each one had her own tears: I alone have them all,
Anguish is private and public both to me.
Fate was kind to those whom the enemy struck down.
I, the sole survivor, must weep for them all.
Radegund of the Thuringii, as recorded by the Merovingian court poet Venantius Fortunatus in De excidio Thoringae, 6th century.  Translation here by Joann McNamara.  Authorship is widely accepted to be by  Radegund herself.

(Source: epistolae.ccnmtl.columbia.edu)

ancientart:

Celtic dagger with gold foil, found in Hochdorf Chieftain’s Grave, Germany. Dates to about 530 BC.

Courtesy & currently located at the Historical Museum of Bern, Switzerland. Photo taken by Xuan Cheurr

Gilded in preparation for the afterlife, this 42cm long, bronze and iron dagger was carried by the prince in life. The blade was protected by a richly decorated sheath. The gold coating made for the burial consisted of 16 parts, all precisely fitted onto the dagger without any fold.

The Hochdorf Chieftain’s Grave is a richly-furnished burial chamber. Regarded as the “Tutankamon of the Celts”, it was discovered in 1977 near Hochdorf an der Enz in Baden-Württemberg, Germany). A man of 40 years old, 6 ft 2 in (178 cm) tall was laid out on a bronze couch. He had been buried with a gold-plated torc on his neck, a bracelet on his right arm, and most notably, thin embossed gold plaques were on his now-disintigrated shoes. At the foot of the couch was a large cauldron decorated with three lions around the brim. The east side of the tomb contained a four-wheeled wagon holding a set of bronze dishes - enough to serve nine people.

(Reblogged from cosmic-rebirth)

forumgamer:

Word. To this day, farm houses in Northern Germany (former Anglo-Saxon lands) are crowned at their gables by two crossed wooden horse-heads. Under old Saxon law, a man was deemed too old/feeble to manage his own affairs if he could not get on his mount unaided. The two legendary brothers who conquered Britain for the Anglo-Saxons are called Hengest and Horsa in legend, both Saxon words for horse. Supposedly, the reason why eating horse-meat is comparitively uncommon in Germany is because it used to be eaten at pagan rituals, and thus the Church banned it.

Interesting, thank you!

BTW I do favor the theory that the Germanic Ur-Heimat is in the steppes, and that this horsey-ness is therefore not an accident.

There were three handspinners’ guilds in medieval Cologne: the silk makers, the gold spinners, and the yarn makers. All three admitted only women. Guild mistresses were often members of the prosperous, politically active, mercantile class, and enjoyed a higher standard of living than is often associated with handspinning…

The gold spinners tended to be involved in family businesses. The ordinances of the Goldspinnerinnen allowed a gold spinner who was the wife of a gold beater to have three apprentices. However, an unmarried gold spinner was permitted to have four apprentices… The gold thread spun in Cologne was of the highest quality. In 1382, the Italian city of Lucca forbade the import of gold threads, but made an exception for gold thread from Cologne, which was required for the finest brocaded silk fabrics.

Likewise, yarn makers were often the wives of wool merchants. They produced both wool and linen yarns. ‘Cologne yarn,’ a blue linen thread of particularly high quality, was much in demand in other countries.

Krystal Morgan, “Handspinners of the Late Middle Ages and Renaissance”

(Source: damaskweaver.files.wordpress.com)

Illustration from German entomologist Maria Sybilla Merian (1647-1717)

via @rmathematicus on Twitter

bluepueblo:

Elevated, Bastei Bridge, Germany

photo via mai

(Reblogged from rhiannonnrings)

midnightzodiac:

Mesolithic female shaman of Bad Dürrenberg, 7000-6500 bce, with reconstructed regalia from animal bones, horns, teeth, and shells. From a wonderful color-illustrated pdf of “Archaeological Finds from Germany” from the paleolithic to the christian era. Other interesting finds too.

Wow, this document is a feast!

(Reblogged from ladyrosaria)